So what resources are out on the web when you want to face up to a possible alcohol issue?

  • October 01, 2014
  • David J. Bilinsky

LAP

(lapbc.com)

Screenshot of LAP websiteDerek LaCroix, QC and his colleagues are truly “lawyers helping lawyers” in any number of areas, including alcohol dependency, depression, stress, family, career issues and other challenges. This free and confidential service is available by telephone 24/7. This service, while funded by the Law Society of BC (LSBC), is independent of the LSBC and all inquiries are strictly confidential. There are also handouts, self-tests, resources, success stories and much more on their comprehensive website. LAP can provide outreach, education and support, and can provide links to resources in the legal, mental health and recovery communities. They provide services for all members of the legal community – judges, students, staff, lawyers and their families. See The CBA (BC) Benevolent Society and LAPBC for more info.

Optum Inc (Formerly PPC Canada)

(optum.ca)

This site offers the LiveWell, BeWell and WorkWell centres. These centres offer helpful information and tools to assist you in addressing challenges and making changes to enhance your life. This confidential service, made available by the LSBC, allows you to contact them 24/7 to seek confidential help with any of life’s challenges.

Addiction Guide

(addictionguide.com)

In the U.S., Addiction Guide was created to provide the most comprehensive information on addiction and addiction treatment. They are a diverse team made up of recovering addicts, healthcare professionals, and patient advocates. Their advocates are committed to providing the most up-to-date information and resources tailored toward each person’s specific needs. Addiction Guide wants to help you find the best care possible.

The mission at Addiction Guide is simple: to serve you in any way they can. Whether addiction is impacting you, a family member, or a friend, the Addiction Guide team will do their best to provide you the tools necessary to start your recovery. For more information on Addiction Guide’s free services or to reach their Patient Support team please contact the Addiction Guide team.

Alcoholics Anonymous

(aa.org)

Screenshot of Alcoholics AnonymousAA is an international fellowship of men and women who have come together to support each other and deal with their alcohol problems using an underlying faith-based program. It is available almost anywhere and membership is open to anyone. Their 12-step program has helped and continues to help millions. The only requirement to join AA is a desire to stop drinking. Anonymity is the foundation of all of their traditions.

Screenshot of Addiction RecoveryLooking for secular approaches to alcohol recovery? The Addiction Recovery Guide lists six different approaches from behaviour therapy to cognitive, behavioural and educational methods.

Drug Rehabilitation Centres

There are a number of centres across Canada offering drug and alcohol rehab programs that use a number of different approaches. alcoholism.about.com/cs/pro/a/blprocan.htm lists at least 31 different centres across Canada.

© 2014 David J. Bilinsky


The views expressed herein are strictly those of David Bilinsky and do not reflect the opinions of the Law Society of British Columbia, CBABC, or their respective members.

David J. Bilinsky is the Practice Management Advisor for the Law Society of British Columbia.

Email: daveb@lsbc.org
Blog: thoughtfullaw.com