The Province of BC announced on June 30, 2021 that we are now in Stage 3 of BC's Restart plan.

In Step 3, all sectors will transition to using communicable disease prevention guidance from WorkSafeBC. During the transition from COVID-19 Safety Plans to communicable disease prevent plans, some workplaces may maintain current COVID-19 Safety Plan protocols for a longer period.  This will include the courts and many legal workplaces.

general Mask guidance

Masks are recommended in indoor public places for all people 12 and older who are not yet fully vaccinated. The mask mandate order under the Emergency Program Act was lifted July 1.

  • You're fully vaccinated 14 days after dose 2
  • Masks are optional for children aged 2 to 12
  • Children under 2 should not wear masks
  • Proof of vaccination does not need to be requested by service providers
  • Some people may choose to continue to wear a mask after they're fully vaccinated and that's okay

We have included the most recent updates from the courts below and we will continue to update and inform CBABC members as this situation continues to evolve. 

Stay informed. Stay safe. 

Court of Appeal for BC
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The Notice Regarding Court of Appeal Procedures and Access to Court Proceedings has been updated as follows:

  • To maintain physical distancing, the courtrooms where appeal proceedings or reviews take place can accommodate a maximum of six (6) counsel or self-represented parties at the counsel tables, and the courtrooms where chambers proceedings take place can accommodate a maximum of four (4) counsel or self-represented parties at the counsel tables. If more counsel or self-represented parties will appear, the parties are directed to decide who will appear via video conference and inform the Court of their choice by submitting the Request to Appear Remotely on the applicable timelines.
  • For appeal hearings where one or more parties appear by video conference, a video link will be posted to the Court’s weekly hearing list. This means that members of the public will have the option of observing some appeal hearings remotely by clicking on the video link provided.  For any hearing, whether in person or a combination of in-person or videoconference, the public may also attend in-person, recognizing there are still limited physically-distanced spaces in the gallery.     
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In response to changing pandemic conditions and public feedback, the Court of Appeal has made the following changes in its COVID-19 Notices:

1. Hearings will take place in courtrooms

  • Beginning July 12, 2021, appeal hearings and chambers proceedings will take place in person in the courtroom, unless parties apply or elect to appear remotely.

2. Parties may apply for permission or elect to appear remotely

  • For appeals, a party may seek the Court’s permission to appear by video conference by filing a Request to Appear Remotely at least ten (10) business days before the appeal hearing. There are no teleconference appearances for appeals.
  • For chambers proceedings, a party may elect to appear remotely by video or teleconference by checking a box on the Request to Appear Remotely and filing the completed form together with their notice of motion, or, if they are responding to the application, at least two (2) business days before the hearing.

3. Lawyers should gown

  • Lawyers should gown for appeal hearings whether they are appearing in person or by video. This change will ensure consistency in presentation when some parties appear in the courtroom and others appear by video.

4. Attend the courtroom in person to observe hearings

  • As all hearings return to the courtroom, including where one or more parties appear by video conference, the Court’s weekly hearing list will no longer include Zoom video links. Observers should check the weekly hearing list and attend the courtroom in person.
  • The Court understands that providing video links to Zoom proceedings during the pandemic made appeal hearings easier to access and will be considering accessibility to court proceedings on an ongoing basis. Media continue to have the option of requesting remote access to digital audio recordings of court proceedings.

5. Filing directions for condensed books and authorities clarified

6. COVID-19 Overview of the Appeal Process Flowchart updated

  • Footnotes added to the appeal process flowchart have been updated to reflect the new procedural steps detailed in the Court’s COVID-19 Notices
Supreme Court of BC
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On March 19, 2020, Chief Justice Hinkson suspended regular operations of the Supreme Court of British Columbia at all of its locations to protect the health and safety of Court users, including judicial officers, litigants, counsel, courthouse staff and the public, and to help contain the spread of COVID-19. Since that time, the Court has issued a number of orders and notices to facilitate the just, speedy and inexpensive determination of all proceedings while protecting the health and safety of Court users. As the province begins to emerge from the pandemic and the provincial state of emergency comes to an end, the Court will be leaving its COVID-19 processes in place until further notice.

Accordingly, on June 30, 2021, the Chief Justice issued COVID-19 Order No. 008, ordering that the Court’s COVID-19 Orders will remain in effect until further order by the Chief Justice or the Associate Chief Justice.

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Chief Justice Hinkson has revised Part IV of COVID-19 Notice No. 27 with respect to the use of masks inside courthouses and courtrooms.

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COVID-19 Notice No. 42

Revised: April 12, 2021 with respect to:

  • telephone contact information,
  • additions to application records (authorities and written arguments),
  • retention, destruction, and pick up of application records, and
  • locations where Masters chambers are proceeding by video, and
  • locations where long chambers are proceeding by video

Download a PDF of this Notice


Effective April 19, 2021, COVID-19 Notice No. 42 has been revised to expand the number of registries where Masters chambers are heard by video using Microsoft Teams and to add long chambers matters in Vancouver and New Westminster to the list of matters that will be heard by video using Microsoft Teams. Other locations will be added as they become available.

Effective immediately, the following changes also apply:

  • If applicants intend to rely on authorities or written arguments, they must be included in the application record.
  • Applicants are encouraged to retrieve their application records. Those intending to do so must notify the court clerk at their hearing and retrieve their application records within five days, unless the hearing has been adjourned and reset for within five days. Application records that are not retrieved will be securely destroyed.
  • Applicants must include telephone numbers with their application records, preferably direct lines.
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COVID-19 Notice No. 32
Revised: April 12, 2021

On March 19, 2020, the Supreme Court of British Columbia suspended regular operations to protect the health and safety of court users and to help contain the spread of COVID-19. All civil and family matters scheduled for trials, conferences, and chambers applications or other hearings between March 19 and May 29, 2020 were adjourned, unless the Court otherwise directed.

This Notice provides further directions in regard to hearings before the registrar, which will resume in accordance with the procedures set out in this Notice.

Download a PDF of this Notice

 

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COVID-19 Notice No. 41
Date: revised March 2, 2021

Highlighted changes:

  • The suspension of civil jury trials has been extended to October 7, 2022.

This notice replaces COVID-19 Notice No. 39 – Civil Jury Selections and Trials.

I. Introduction

Effective March 19, 2020, Chief Justice Hinkson suspended regular operations of the Supreme Court of British Columbia at all of its locations to protect the health and safety of court users and to help contain the spread of COVID-19. As part of the suspension, the Court cancelled civil jury selections and civil jury trials up to and including January 1, 2021, everywhere in the province.

II. Civil Jury Trials Suspended up to and including October 7, 2022

Effective September 28, 2020, the Supreme Court Civil Rules were amended to temporarily suspend civil jury trials, and the operation of related rules, up to and including October 3, 2021. For more details about the changes, please see Order-in Council No. 517/2020, available here. On March 2, 2021, the suspension of civil jury trials was extended up to and including October 7, 2022. For more details about the extension please see Order-in-Council No. 105/2021, available here.

The new rules provide that trials scheduled to be heard before October 8, 2022 will automatically proceed by judge alone, regardless of whether a party filed or served a notice requiring trial by jury or paid jury fees.

The new rules also provide that, unless the Court otherwise orders, a party must not apply for an adjournment of a trial because the party may want to require that the trial be heard by the Court with a jury.

Notices requiring trial by jury will not be accepted for filing for trials scheduled to take place before October 8, 2022.

III. Civil Jury Trials Scheduled on or after October 8, 2022

Civil jury trials will resume on October 8, 2022.

Under subrule 12-6(0.3), on or after March 29, 2021, a party may require a jury trial for a trial that is scheduled to take place on or after October 8, 2022 by doing the following:

  • within 21 days after service of the notice of trial but at least 45 days before the trial, file a notice requiring trial by jury (Form 47) and serve a copy of the filed notice on all parties of record; and
  • at least 45 days before trial, pay jury fees to the sheriff.

Under subrule 12-6(0.4), on or after March 29, 2021, if a party files a notice under subrule 12-6(0.3)(a), a party on whom the notice has been served may make an application under subrule 12-6(5) for an order that the trial or part of it be heard by the Court without a jury.

THE FOREGOING IS SUBJECT TO CHANGE. ANY UPDATED DIRECTIONS WILL BE POSTED ON THE COURT’S WEBSITE.

Dated March 2, 2021, at Vancouver, British Columbia

By Direction of Chief Justice Christopher E. Hinkson
Supreme Court of British Columbia

Provincial Court of BC
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The Provincial Court of British Columbia recognizes that the Province is still impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic and continues to conduct proceedings virtually and in person throughout the Province. For further information about in-person proceedings and attendance, see NP 22 In-Person Proceedings and Attendance During COVID-19 Health and Safety Protocols. For further information regarding virtual proceedings, see NP 21 Virtual Proceedings and Remote Attendance in the Provincial Court.

Download NP 19

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Purpose

This Notice describes the health and safety protocols in place for in-person proceedings and attendance during COVID-19. As described in Notice to the Profession and Public 19, the Provincial Court is conducting proceedings virtually and in person throughout the Province. Anyone attending a proceeding in person must be in full compliance with this Notice.

Judges, Judicial Justices, and Judicial Case Managers (“Judicial Officers”) have the discretion to direct more detailed precautions depending on the circumstances of a particular court proceeding.

Download NP 22

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NP 21 Virtual Proceedings and Remote Attendance in the Provincial Court revises the title of the Notice from “Virtual Proceedings in the Provincial Court”; and adds definitions of “virtual(ly)” and “remote(ly)” under Purpose, references to attending virtual or in-person court proceedings remotely, “Inappropriate profiles or background images must not be used” to s. I.1.b., s. I.1.i. re enabling landscape mode when using a Smartphone, and no smoking or vaping to s. 1.2.l.

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The Provnicial Court of BC has updated the following Notices to the Profession and Public that are in effect starting July 2, 2021: 

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Effective Date: 25 May 2021
SM. CL. 02  Revisions in red ​

PRACTICE DIRECTION

SMALL CLAIMS PROCEEDINGS DURING COVID-19

Purpose

In order to facilitate the just, speedy, inexpensive and simple resolution of small claims matters while protecting the health and safety of all court users during the COVID-19 pandemic, this Practice Direction sets: (A) the default method of hearing and appearance for small claims proceedings; and (B) the timelines and processes for litigants to file required documents with the Court and, in some instances, serve the documents, in advance of a trial conference, settlement conference, application to a judge, payment hearing, or Rule 9.1 simplified trial.

In this Practice Direction, the term “virtual proceeding” means a hearing or case conference conducted by telephone or Microsoft Teams (“Teams”) audioconference or videoconference.

Application

This practice direction applies to all court registries in the Province.

Further to OIC 310/2021 ordered May 25, 2021, until the provincial state of emergency expires or is cancelled, certain requirements in the Small Claims Rules, B.C. Reg. 261/93 are modified to facilitate the following directions and procedures.

A. Default Method of Hearing and Appearances

  1. For small claims trials, including Rule 9.1 simplified trials and Rule 9.2 summary trials, and Rule 13 default hearings, the default method of hearing and appearance will be inperson, unless a judge otherwise orders or directs.
  2. For small claims trial conferences, settlement conferences, applications to a judge1, and payment hearings, the default method of hearing and appearance will be by telephone or Teams audioconference or videoconference, unless a judge or judicial justice otherwise orders or directs.
  3. A party seeking an alternate method of hearing or appearance must make an application to a judge or judicial justice as applicable.
  4. For small claims proceedings by Teams, parties are strongly encouraged to use videoconference. For every Teams proceeding, a dial-in conference number will also be provided so that parties can participate by telephone if they are unable to do so by videoconference or if their video connection fails during the proceeding.
  5. Despite Rules 16.1(7) and 17(16), sworn evidence may be given and received by telephone or Teams audioconference or videoconference.
  6. Parties must read and comply with:
    1. The Policy on Use of Electronic Devices in Courtrooms and Access to Court Proceedings Policy for all small claims proceedings, whether in-person or virtual, including the general prohibition on the recording or broadcasting of small claims proceedings unless authorized by the Court; and
    2. Notice to the Profession and Public 21 for virtual proceedings.

B. Timelines and Process for Filing and Serving Required Documents

The existing filing and service requirements under the Small Claims Rules continue to apply unless modified as set out below.

For Applications to a Judge and Payment Hearings, parties shall use the Supporting Materials Form when filing their documents.

1. Trial Conferences

Where the parties have been directed to attend a virtual or in person Trial Conference (Rule 7.5), parties must file a Trial Statement (Form 33) at least 14 days before the date set for the Trial Conference (Rule 7.5(9)). When the Trial Conference is scheduled, parties will receive an Information for Virtual Appearance document from the court registry about how to connect to the virtual appearance and file the Trial Statement with attached copies of all relevant documents before the Trial Conference.

2. Settlement Conferences

Where a Settlement Conference has been set for hearing by telephone or Teams audioconference or videoconference, parties shall file their relevant documents and reports for consideration at the Settlement Conference [Rules 7(5) and (13)] at the court registry at least two business days before the Settlement Conference. When the Settlement Conference is scheduled, parties will receive an Information for Virtual Appearance document from the court registry about how to connect to the virtual appearance and submit their relevant documents and reports before the Settlement Conference.

3. Applications to a Judge

Where a litigant files an application to a judge [Rules 16(6) and 16.1] and a virtual hearing is scheduled, the court registry will provide the applicant with an Information for Virtual Appearance document about how to connect to the virtual hearing and how the parties can file documents related to the application two business days in advance of the hearing. The applicant shall serve a copy of Information for Virtual Appearance document and a blank Supporting Materials Form on the other party or parties when serving them with a copy of the application.

4. Payment Hearings

  1. Where a debtor has been ordered by a judge or judicial justice to attend a payment hearing, and the payment hearing is scheduled for hearing by telephone or Teams audioconference or videoconference, the debtor shall file the financial documents they are required to bring to the payment hearing [Rule 12(9)] at least two business days in advance of the payment hearing. The court registry will provide the creditor and debtor with an Information for Virtual Appearance document about how to connect to the virtual hearing, and how the debtor can file their documents in advance of the hearing.
  2. Where a creditor files a Summons to a Payment Hearing (Form 12) and the payment hearing is scheduled by telephone or Teams audioconference or videoconference, the court registry will provide the creditor with an Information for Virtual Appearance document about how to connect to the virtual hearing and how the debtor can file the financial documents listed in the summons in advance of the hearing. The creditor shall serve a copy of the Information for Virtual Appearance document and a blank Supporting Materials Form on the debtor when serving them with a copy of the summons. The debtor shall file the documents listed on the summons at least two business days in advance of the payment hearing.
  3. Where a debtor has requested a payment hearing and has filed a Notice of Payment Hearing Form (Form 13) [Rule 12(10)], and the payment hearing has been scheduled by telephone or Teams audioconference or videoconference, the court registry will provide the debtor with an Information for Virtual Appearance document about how to connect to the virtual hearing and how the parties can file any related documents at least two business days in advance of the hearing. The debtor shall serve a copy of the Information for Virtual Appearance document and a blank Supporting Materials Form on the creditor when serving them with a copy of the Notice of Payment Hearing.

5. Rule 9.1 Simplified Trials

Where Rule 9.1 applies (Simplified Trials), the parties must file a completed Trial Statement (Form 33) with attached copies of all relevant documents at least 14 days before the date set for trial [Rule 9.1(17)]. Parties will receive information from the court registry when they are notified of their trial date about how to file their Trial Statement and related documents.

History of Practice Direction
  • Original practice direction dated April 19, 2021.
  • May 25, 2021: updated per OIC 310/2021. ​

I make this practice direction pursuant to my authority under OIC 310/2021 ordered May 25, 2021, Provincial Court Act, R.S.B.C. 1996, c. 379, the Small Claims Act, R.S.B.C. 1996, c. 430 and the Small Claims Rules, B.C. Reg. 261/93.

Melissa Gillespie
Chief Judge
Provincial Court of British Columbia


1. Under Small Claims Rules 6(5), 1.1(41.22), 3(8), 7.3(42), 8(1)(b), 8(1.1), 12(8), and 16(6). |

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Effective date: 02 February 2021
CRIM 13

PRACTICE DIRECTION

INITIAL APPEARANCE COURT DURING COVID-19

Purpose

Further to Notice to the Profession and Public 19, the Provincial Court has resumed initial appearance court (IAR) for criminal matters. At the same time, the Court remains mindful of the need to protect the health and safety of all court users and help contain the spread of COVID19, while maintaining meaningful access to the Court. The purpose of this Practice Direction is to set out some guidelines to govern IAR while ensuring that people only come to IAR in-person when necessary.

Directions

A. Alternatives to in-person appearance

1. To reduce the number of people attending court, counsel attendance at court should be limited to appearing on a matter scheduled in court where something substantive is happening. Counsel must endeavor to avoid unnecessary personal attendances of the accused or counsel at the courthouse wherever possible.

2. The Consent Arraignment form (Form 4) may be used as an alternative to a personal appearance for adult criminal matters for entering not guilty pleas, elections, as well as for setting dates for preliminary inquiries, trials, hearings and/or pre-trial conference (see CRIM 12 Practice Direction to determine if a pre-trial conference is required).

3. If the only purpose is to adjourn a matter to another date, neither counsel nor their client should attend court. The Consent Requisition form (Form 1) may be used to: change an appearance date; cancel an interim appearance; request an earlier appearance; indicate a guilty plea; set a date for sentencing; schedule an application before a judge; or cancel trial date(s) and schedule a disposition hearing (but not adjourning a trial).

To email any of these forms to the Court, please see the email contact information for the applicable local JCM Office here or as noted on the forms.

4. See CPD-1 and CRIM 08 for further information about these forms.

B. In Person Appearances

1. For those cases where in-person appearances are necessary, the following processes will apply.

2. Legal Aid:

  • Legal Aid BC (Legal Aid) intake workers will not be present at courthouses.
  • Where Legal Aid duty counsel is present at courthouses they will assist the accused. Assistance may include:
    1. describing the process;
    2. assisting the accused to connect with a lawyer;
    3. collecting contact information that will allow the lawyer and accused to connect; and,
    4. assisting to have the accused adjourned to another date.
  • The process by which the accused will be adjourned will depend on procedures determined at the applicable local court location.
  • It is not expected that files will be resolved on these appearances.

3. Duty counsel will not provide legal representation where counsel has already been retained, whether privately or through Legal Aid, unless specifically requested to do so by counsel and/or the accused.

4. At the accused’s first court appearance, an abbreviated disclosure package may be available at locations where Crown counsel are appearing in person. Full disclosure will subsequently be available electronically upon request to Crown counsel by counsel for the accused. Self-represented litigants will be requested to contact local Crown counsel offices by email or telephone to schedule the pickup of paper disclosure packages.

5. If the matter needs to be adjourned, it will generally be adjourned for at least six to eight weeks so that by the next court date, the accused is in a position to do something substantive such as fix a date for a trial or pre-trial conference or resolve the file.

6. Defence counsel, upon accepting a Legal Aid contract, must advise the Crown counsel office responsible for the prosecution that they are representing the accused. Defence counsel are encouraged to do so in writing.

7. Counsel must communicate with each other before any court appearance so that the appearance will result in something substantive happening. If not, counsel must adjourn the matter to another date without the parties having to attend court.

8. Court appearances are not required to obtain disclosure.

History of Practice Direction

  • Original Practice Direction effective June 12, 2020.
  • October 1, 2020: Housekeeping changes – reference to “more than half a day” revised to “more than one day” further to the revised CRIM 12 Practice Direction.
  • October 7, 2020 revised to delete historical information that was in the “Application” section.
  • February 2, 2021 deleted “Pre-trial conferences” section as CRIM 12 Practice Direction is now linked; consequential amendment to para. A3 further to revised CPD-1 Practice Direction; and housekeeping changes.

I make this practice direction pursuant to my authority under the Provincial Court Act, R.S.B.C. 1996, c. 379.

Melissa Gillespie
Chief Judge
Provincial Court of British Columbia

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Effective date: 01 February 2021
CRIM 12

PRACTICE DIRECTION

CRIMINAL PRE-TRIAL CONFERENCES DURING COVID-19

Background

In R. v. Jordan, 2016 SCC 27, the Supreme Court of Canada told all participants in the criminal justice system they have “a role to play in changing courtroom culture and facilitating a more efficient criminal justice system” (at para. 45). Participants were directed to engage in “proactive, preventative problem solving” (supra, at para. 112) and encouraged to “eliminate or avoid inefficient practices” (supra, at para. 117).

Since these directions in Jordan, over three quarters of all criminal files set for trial in Provincial Court collapsed on the scheduled trial date because of guilty pleas, stays of proceedings, bench warrants or adjournments. In this same timeframe, only 4% of all criminal files actually proceeded to a hearing in the Provincial Court. These statistics reveal that too many criminal files are set for trial and do not proceed causing significant scheduling difficulties and inefficient use of court time.

These concerns are amplified in light of the COVID-19 pandemic. The Provincial Court is implementing this practice direction to help address these concerns by mandating pre-trial conferences for criminal files (adult and youth) at all Provincial Court locations in the Province. This practice direction also represents one of the steps the Court is taking to resume court operations during the COVID-19 pandemic while ensuring public health continues to be protected.

Purpose

There are two main purposes behind these pre-trial conferences. The first is to reduce the number of files being set for trial by helping to ensure that only those requiring a trial are actually set for hearing. The second purpose is to manage those files that are to be set for trial to ensure that accurate time estimates have been determined prior to dates being set and ensure hearings complete on time as scheduled.

The practice direction’s overarching aim is to reduce these inefficiencies in the criminal justice system by employing pre-trial conferences as a tool for the participants to collaborate and conduct cases more efficiently for the overall benefit of the administration of justice. The Court is committed to ensuring the fair, efficient and timely resolution of criminal files and to upholding the accused’s right to be tried within a reasonable time. Using pre-trial conferences to help reduce day of trial collapse rates and trial continuations is an important part of that commitment.

Application

Effective February 1, 2021, this practice directive applies to adult and youth criminal files in the Provincial Court requiring trial or preliminary inquiry time (“trial time”) as follows:

Court File – Region Trial Time
Fraser
Interior
Vancouver
  1. Requiring 3 days or more of trial time; or
  2. Requiring at least 1 day but less than 3 days of trial time, where a pre-trial conference is requested by both counsel
Northern
Vancouver Island
  1. Requiring 2 days or more of trial time; or
  2. Requiring at least 1 day but less than 2 days of trial time, where a pre-trial conference is requested by both counsel

All files as set out above must have a pre-trial conference before being scheduled for a trial or preliminary inquiry. Where the accused has more than one criminal file with at least one file as described above, their other file(s) may be included in the pre-trial conference for resolution discussions. Counsel should provide these additional file numbers to the Judicial Case Manager when scheduling the pre-trial conference.

This practice direction only applies to files where the accused is represented by counsel. Selfrepresented accused with trials requiring one day or more of trial time will have a pre-trial conference set before a judge, preferably the trial judge, approximately 8 to 10 weeks before the first date of trial for trial management purposes as described in NP 19.

Directions

A. General

  1. The pre-trial conference judge will not be the trial judge if the matter proceeds to trial. If the matter is resolved prior to trial, the disposition may be done by the pre-trial conference judge or assigned to another judge. Where multiple pre-trial conferences occur on a file, the pre-trial conferences will be conducted by the same judge unless that judge is unavailable.
  2. Pre-trial conferences will take place during court sitting hours unless reasonable accommodation of counsel’s schedule is required. Pre-trial conferences will be set in 30 to 45 minute intervals, although counsel may request additional time if they feel it will be required.
  3. Unless otherwise ordered by the pre-trial conference judge, pre-trial conferences will be held via videoconference or audioconference and off the record.
  4. Crown counsel with conduct of the file1 (“Crown counsel”) and counsel for the accused must attend all pre-trial conferences, unless the pre-trial conference judge directs otherwise.

B. Before the pre-trial conference

  1. Before a pre-trial conference, Crown counsel and counsel for the accused must have:
    1. Thoroughly reviewed their files, and
    2. Discussed with each other the issues set out in paragraph 8.
  2. The parties may provide, and are encouraged to provide, the opposite party and the pre-trial conference judge with any materials that may assist with resolution discussions and trial management issues. Unless the parties agree otherwise, these materials are to be used only for pre-trial conference purposes; these materials will not be added to the court file and will be returned to the submitting party if requested or destroyed when no longer necessary for those purposes. At a minimum, Crown counsel must provide a Crown Synopsis in Form 1 (CRIM 12), a copy of the Information Crown counsel is proceeding on, and any criminal record of the accused. At least three business days prior to a scheduled pre-trial conference, the parties must exchange copies of all materials for the pre-trial conference and must deliver, electronically or otherwise, a copy of those materials to the Judicial Case Manager at the applicable court location for the attention of the pre-trial conference judge.
  3. If Crown counsel or counsel for the accused requests a preliminary inquiry, that party shall file a Statement of Issues and Witnesses in Form 2 (CRIM 12) unless otherwise ordered by the Court. The statement is to be filed with the Court preferably at the arraignment hearing.

C. At the pre-trial conference

  1. At a pre-trial conference, the parties are required to have authority and be prepared to make decisions about:
    1. resolution of the matter;
    2. disclosure;
    3. applications, including ones pursuant to the Charter, that the parties will bring at or before trial;
    4. the number and identity of witnesses the Crown counsel intends to call at the preliminary inquiry or at trial;
    5. any admissions the parties are willing to make;
    6. any legal issues that the parties anticipate may arise in the proceeding; and
    7. an estimate of the time needed to complete the proceeding.

      Parties should review the Pre-Trial Conference Checklist for the types of issues that may be discussed at the pre-trial conference.
      Commentary: In order to ensure they are able to make decisions on these issues, counsel for the accused must have communicated with their client to obtain instructions. For Crown counsel, they must have communicated with any civilian witnesses essential to the viability of the prosecution (for example, sex assault complainants) in order to assess their reliability and level of interest in the matter as well as obtain any resolution input where that may be appropriate.

      The pre-trial conference judge will proactively canvass resolution in order to avoid setting trial dates. If the accused or their counsel require some time before proceeding to disposition, they should not be setting trial dates to obtain that time but rather pleading guilty and obtaining that time by adjourning the disposition. For Crown counsel, they need to be reasonable and realistic in their sentencing positions and exercise “enhanced discretion for resolving individual cases” (Jordan, para. 138). The pre-trial conference judge will also proactively canvass the issues to reduce them to only those requiring adjudication, and then determining both how much time will be required and how the file is to be scheduled. The intention is to ensure that those files that actually proceed to trial complete as scheduled thereby avoiding continuation dates that generate further delays in completing criminal proceedings.

D. After the pre-trial conference

  1. After hearing from the parties during a pre-trial conference, the pre-trial conference judge may take one or more of the following steps:
    1. make any case management directions or orders;
    2. confirm or amend the estimates of the time required to hear the proceeding;
    3. set timelines for the exchange of materials on applications to be heard, or for the completion of disclosure;
    4. set parameters for the hearing of applications;
    5. confirm any admissions made on the record and have all parties sign off on the admissions in writing;
    6. adjourn to the Judicial Case Manager to set a date for:
      1. a subsequent pre-trial conference;
      2. disposition;
      3. preliminary inquiry; or
      4. trial.
    7. take any further steps or provide any further directions consistent with the purpose of this Practice Direction.
  2. Following the conclusion of a pre-trial conference, any directions or orders made by the pre-trial conference judge may be reduced to writing or otherwise recorded.
  3. If the matter is confirmed or set for hearing, a pre-trial conference will be set prior to the first date of hearing to ensure the matter will still be proceeding on the scheduled dates. If following this pre-trial conference, the file remains set for hearing, the pre-trial conference judge will then complete a Pre-Trial Conference Record, including any agreements or admissions, and have it placed in the court file.

    Commentary: The parties can again expect the pre-trial conference judge to proactively pursue resolution and trial manage the file at this pre-trial conference. The Pre-Trial Conference Record will record any admissions, trial scheduling directions, witness issues and other details the trial judge needs to know for conducting the trial.
  4. If following a pre-trial conference, the matter is confirmed or scheduled for trial or preliminary inquiry, the pre-trial conference judge may complete a Pre-Trial Conference Report and have it placed in the court file. The Pre-Trial Conference Report will provide information the trial judge needs to know for conducting the trial, including any admissions, agreements, orders or trial scheduling directions made, and any issues that are expected to arise. If counsel wish to receive a copy of this Report, they can obtain it from the court file at the originating registry or they can request it be sent to them electronically by providing their e-mail addresses to the pre-trial conference judge at the pre-trial conference.

History of Practice Direction

  • Original practice direction dated April 28, 2020.
  • See also NP 19 COVID-19: Commencing Recovery of Some Court Operations.
  • The Supreme Court of British Columbia has issued CPD-3, Criminal Practice Direction.
  • Updated practice direction dated June 12, 2020 revising “Application” section and changing reference in para. A2 from “one hour” to “30 to 45 minute”. • Updated practice direction dated July 2, 2020 revising “Application” section.
  • Updated practice direction effective September 28, 2020 (revises “Application” section and makes consequential amendments; deletes Pre-Trial Conference Record and adds Pre-Trial Conference Checklist and Report); adds para. 12.
  • Updated practice direction effective February 1, 2021 (revises “Application” section).

I make this practice direction pursuant to my authority under the Provincial Court Act, R.S.B.C. 1996, c. 379 and Rule 3 of the Provincial Court of British Columbia Criminal Caseflow Management Rules, SI/99-104.

Melissa Gillespie
Chief Judge
Provincial Court of British Columbia

1 For the purpose of this Practice Direction, “Crown counsel with conduct of the file” may include the applicable “Intake Crown” until the “Trial Crown” is assigned.

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In light of concerns raised by the BC Courts, counsel and other courthouse users about the need for timely and coordinated communication about COVID-19 testing and exposures in courthouses, the three levels of Court and Court Services Branch met with senior health officials and have created a Protocol that is now in effect with these main components:

  1. A Public Health Guidance document for courthouses that is publicly posted here.
  2. The BC Centre for Disease Control has created a webpage where the following type of information will be posted about COVID-19 and courthouses: COVID-19 exposures at courthouses where a medical health officer of public health specialist has determined there is a risk of infection to others; incident investigations, notices and summaries related to potential COVID-19 clusters, outbreaks or group testing; and, courthouse site inspections.
  3. Each Regional Health Authority will be responsible for courthouse COVID-19 incident investigations, response and timely communication with the courts, Court Services Branch and where appropriate the public, recognizing that the Health Authorities alone have the information about COVID-19 incidents, cases, exposures, clusters and outbreaks.
  4. If there is to be group testing at a courthouse, notice will be communicated by the Regional Health Authority to those court participants relevant to the investigation.
  5. Targeted access to COVID-19 testing for court participants in relation to anticipated or ongoing court proceedings where, for example, a court participant is experiencing COVID-19 like symptoms and testing is required to determine whether the court proceeding can continue as scheduled.

See the Protocol here.

We thank everyone for their ongoing efforts to support the Courts and the justice system through this extremely challenging time. The Courts are committed to remaining open and accessible, and have taken steps to ensure safety as noted on the following websites:

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Effective Date: 07 December 2020
FAM 08

PRACTICE DIRECTION

EARLY RESOLUTION PROCESS AND EXPEDITED COURT PROCESS TO CHANGE OR
SUSPEND CHILD OR SPOUSAL SUPPORT DUE TO COVID-19

Purpose & Application

The purpose of this Practice Direction is to set out the early resolution process and expedited court process that is available (but not required) for a party who is only seeking a suspension or change to an existing agreement or Provincial Court order about child support or spousal support as a result of a change in income since January 2020 that is related to COVID-19.

For all other relief (including relief for outstanding arrears prior to January 2020) or counterclaims not related to the above, parties may make an application in the normal course on July 8, 2020 when Provincial Court registries are able to accept new family filings.

This practice direction applies to all court registries in the Province. Variations in process due to the Early Resolution and Case Management Model at the Victoria and Surrey registries are noted under section 4 below.

Direction

  1. Effective July 2, 2020 until further direction, the early resolution and expedited court process set out here may be used by parties seeking a suspension or change to an existing agreement or Provincial Court order about child support or spousal support as a result of a change in income since January 2020 related to COVID-19.
  2. Early Resolution Process
    1. How to begin (Intake)
      1. Contact the Family Justice Services Division (Family Justice Services) to schedule your individual needs assessment interview at:
      1. Complete an individual needs assessment with Family Justice Services by telephone or videoconference to identify: the issue(s) that need to be resolved; and determine whether the dispute resolution process is appropriate.
        1. Parties may also receive referrals to legal advice and other community supports.
        2. .A party may be contacted by Family Justice Services if someone else completed the form and named them in the form.
      2. Complete the “Notice of Intention to Change Existing Child or Spousal Support Due to COVID-19 Income Change” form and provide a copy to Family Justice Services and all other parties as noted on the form.
    2. Participation In Dispute Resolution Process
      1. If it is determined that participation in the Dispute Resolution Process is appropriate during the intake process, the parties may participate in a process which may include: mediation with a family justice counsellor, family law mediator, a collaborative family law process, or facilitated negotiation with a child support officer.
      2. Each party must provide financial information as required by Family Justice Services or the dispute resolution professional.
      3. If the parties reach an agreement,Family Justice Services or the dispute resolution professional involved may assist the parties to draft a variation of an existing written agreement which can be filed with the court for enforcement purposes; or assist the parties to apply to the court for a consent variation of an existing court order.
      4. If the parties do not reach an agreement but at least one party has completed a needs assessment interview, the matter may proceed to the expedited court process set out below.
      5. Family Justice Services will complete the bottom of the “Notice of Intention to Change Existing Child or Spousal Support Due to COVID-19 Income Change” form to indicate that one or all of the parties have completed an individual needs assessment interview.
  3. Expediated Court Process
    1. The party must submit the following forms required for court to the Pre-court Case Management Service (PCCM) which can be reached by telephone (604-660-2528 or Toll free 1-866-660-2684) or by email at pccm@gov.bc.ca:
    2. PCCM will review to ensure documents are complete. Once completed, PCCM will file the documents with the court for the party by emailing the documents to the applicable registry.
    3. The party must serve a copy of each of the documents on all other parties to the order or agreement.
    4. The party filing a reply must submit their documents to PCCM, which can be reached by telephone (604-660-2528 or Toll free 1-866-660-2684) or by email at pccm@gov.bc.ca. PCCM will review to ensure documents are complete. Once completed, PCCM will file the documents with the court for the party by emailing the documents to the applicable registry.
      1. See the Provincial Court (Family) Rules regarding documents that need to be filed, which may include a Financial Statement.
    5. A hearing will be scheduled after a reply has been filed, or the reply period has passed and proof of service has been filed.
    6. Each party may be required to provide additional financial information as required by the court.
    7. In some situations, such as where there is corporate income, previously imputed income, or lack of adequate financial information, an Amicus (legal counsel who is not counsel for a party but who assists the court) may review the filed material and speak to it in court. Parties will be advised whether they can expect Amicus to assist the court with their matter prior to the hearing.
    8. These matters will be heard by telephone or videoconference unless a judge orders otherwise.

      Note: When applying to court to vary a child support order, the requirement to complete the Parenting After Separation Program and to file a certificate of completion with the court registry still applies for the following court locations: Abbotsford, Campbell River, Chilliwack, Courtenay, Kamloops, Kelowna, Nanaimo, New Westminster, North Vancouver, Penticton, Port Coquitlam, Prince George, Richmond, Surrey, Vancouver (Robson Square) and Vernon. If you have already completed the program in the 24 months prior to filing the application, you may be exempt from this requirement. (See Provincial Court (Family) Rules, Rule 21).
  4. Victoria and Surrey Registries (only)
    Variations in process at the Victoria and Surrey registries, due to the Early Resolution and Case Management Model, are noted here.
    1. Early Resolution Process
      1. Complete and file the “Notice to Resolve a Family Law Matter” form to enter into the process (not the “Notice of Intention to Change Existing Child or Spousal Support Due to COVID-19 Income Change”form).
      2. FMEP clients must provide a copy of the “Notice to Resolve a Family Law Matter” form to their enforcement officer.
      3. Each party must meet the early resolution requirements as set out in the Provincial Court (Family) Rules Appendix B, Part 2.
    2. Expedited Court Process
      1. If, after having met the early resolution requirements, a court proceeding is required to change the support order or agreement,the party must submit the following documents to PCCM,which can be reached by telephone (604-660-2528 or Toll free 1-866-660-2684) or by email at pccm@gov.bc.ca,and serve a copy on each other party of the following documents found under “Early Resolution and Case Management Registry Forms (only in the Victoria court registry)”:
      2. FMEP clients must also provide a copy of the documents to their enforcement officer as required by the Family Maintenance Enforcement Act.

History of Practice Direction

  • Original practice direction effective July 02, 2020.
  • Revised practice direction effective December 07, 2020 (updated to add the Early Resolution and Case Management Model in Surrey). 

I make this practice direction pursuant to my authority under the Provincial Court Act, R.S.B.C. 1996, c. 379 and Rule 20(13) of the Provincial Court (Family) Rules, B.C. Reg. 417/98.

Melissa Gillespie
Chief Judge
Provincial Court of British Columbia

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Policy Code: ACC-1

Purpose of Policy

The Court has underlined its commitment to public and media access to court proceedings in Public and Media Access Policies - The Principles of Openness. The purpose of this Policy is to clarify the circumstances and procedures under which members of the public and media have access to in person and virtual court proceedings.

Policy

Members of the public and the media are welcome to attend in person and virtual sessions of the Court. In some circumstances, either legislation requires, or a judge may order, that a proceeding, or part of a proceeding, be held in private. In those circumstances, neither the general public nor the media may be present while Court is in session.

In this Policy, the term “court proceedings” does not include case conferences. Given the private and confidential nature of case conferences, including pre-trial conferences, small claims settlement conferences, small claims trial conferences, and family case conferences, only parties and their lawyers, if they have lawyers, may attend an inperson or virtual case conference unless otherwise permitted by the presiding judge.

At this time, in person attendance at court proceedings is subject to NP 22 Resuming In-Person Proceedings During COVID-19: Health & Safety Protocols. NP 22 provides that in order to maintain a safe physical distance in the public gallery between members of the media and public, the number of seats available in courtrooms will be limited, and entry into the courtroom will not be permitted if the safe physical distancing requirements cannot be maintained.

1. Access to Virtual Hearings

1.1 In this Policy, the term “virtual hearing” refers to a court hearing conducted by audioconference (including telephone) or videoconference. Currently, all judicial interim release (bail) hearings, unless a judge or justice orders otherwise, and some criminal disposition hearings are virtual hearings, and accessible as set out below.

1.2 Members of the public and media wishing to hear or observe a virtual hearing may email the applicable Court Registry as far in advance as possible before the hearing and provide the following information about the hearing they would like to hear or observe:

1.2.1 case name,
1.2.2 case number (if known), and
1.2.3 hearing date (Daily court hearing lists are available here).

1.3 The Court Registry will provide instructions on how to join the virtual hearing.

1.4 Observation of a virtual hearing may be subject to limits on the number of participants that can be connected.

1.5 If observers do not call in at the set time or if the connection is lost, the Court will not disrupt the hearings to connect them.

1.6 The Court’s NP 21 Guide to Virtual Proceedings applies to virtual hearings and sets out virtual hearings etiquette, including:

No recording: You are not permitted to audio- or video-record any portion of a virtual hearing (except accredited media may audio-record for notetaking purposes only). Some hearings are confidential and there may be a publication ban in effect. The BC Courts’ Policy on the Use of Electronic Devices sets out penalties for recording, including prosecution.

1.7 People wishing to hear or observe a virtual hearing must read and comply with NP 21.

1.8 Accredited media should also see Notice to Accredited Media re Access to Provincial Court Proceedings during COVID-19 regarding remote access to other court proceedings.

2. Decorum when Court in Session

2.1 The judge and those participating in court proceedings need to hear clearly everything that is said, and to concentrate on the evidence and submissions. Therefore, persons observing when a Court is in session must act so as not to disturb the Court process. For example, doors to the courtroom should be closed gently if the Court is in session. Members of the public are asked to remain silent when in the Courtroom and to refrain from speaking loudly in the hallways outside of courtrooms.

2.2 If a member of the public or media must enter or exit a courtroom while Court is in session, he or she is urged to do so as quietly and with as little disruption to the proceedings as is possible.

2.3 The basic principle to be remembered is that the conduct of a trial or hearing must not be disturbed; on occasion and to protect the process, a judge may exercise his or her discretion to order that no one enter or leave the courtroom. Such an order might occur during the testimony of a particular witness, during an address by a litigant or a lawyer to the Court, or when the Court is giving a decision about a matter. If such an order has been made, the sheriff on duty will enforce it.

2.4 When listening to a virtual hearing by telephone, a landline may work best. To avoid interrupting the hearing, if using a cell phone put it in silent mode. When observing a video hearing, mute your microphone and turn off your camera.

3. Movement Beyond the Bar

3.1 No member of the media or the public is permitted beyond the Bar in a courtroom, which by convention and long-established practice is an area reserved for lawyers or self-represented litigants engaged in the presentation of a matter to the Court, unless express permission is given by the presiding Judge or Judicial Justice.

3.2 If a member of the media wishes to make an application to the presiding Judge to, for instance, comment upon a discretionary publication ban application, they may rise in the general gallery of the courtroom and ask the presiding Judge to allow them to come into the body of the Court beyond the Bar to orally make an application related to the proceeding.

4. General Guidelines for Media

4.1 Members of the media should also consult the Court’s Public and Media Access Policies, including the Use of Electronic Devices in Courtrooms Policy, Notice to Accredited Media re Access to Provincial Court Proceedings during COVID-19, and the Media Accreditation Process, as well as ACC-2 Access to Court Records Policy and ACC-3 Information Regarding Bans on Publication.

4.2 When attending Provincial Courthouses in British Columbia, members of the media are asked to conduct themselves with the safety and dignity of the people coming and going from the Court uppermost in their minds.

4.3 They should also be mindful of any publication bans or restrictions imposed by legislation or by the presiding judge.

4.4 These guidelines in no way interfere with the discretion of the presiding judge to resolve issues that arise in a specific trial or matter.

4.5 Whenever in courthouses, media who have sought and obtained accreditation are asked to keep their identification tags on their person at all times and produce them when so requested by a Sheriff or court official.

4.6 Accredited media possessing identification tags will have priority in areas designated for the media unless circumstances relating to issues of safety and/or security make it impossible.

4.7 Accredited members of the media should give the Sheriff or Court Clerk as much advance notice as practical when they intend to use any audio recording device in any Courthouse.

5. Cameras

5.1 As a general rule, when court is in session, the use of cameras – including television cameras and cell phone cameras – is prohibited in any Provincial Court in British Columbia. Camera operators may take cameras into courtrooms for safekeeping if they terminate the power supply. Members of the media may apply to the Court for permission to record a particular session of the Court (see below under “Televising courtroom proceedings”).

5.2 Similarly, visual recording or photographing of a courtroom when Court is not in session is not permitted without the express permission of the Chief Judge.

5.3 Filming or visual recording requests in a courthouse for educational and court related information purposes may be approved at the discretion of the Chief Judge. Photographing, videotaping and filming in the court facilities are not otherwise permitted. Exceptions to the policy may be made if the approval of the Chief Judge has been obtained in advance.

5.4 Visual recording of judges’ chambers and sheriff cells is strictly prohibited.

5.5 Taking photographs, including screenshots, of a videoconference proceeding is strictly prohibited.

6. Televising Court Proceedings

6.1 Applications may be made to a judge of the Court to televise or broadcast all or part of the proceedings in a particular case. It is the policy of the Court that such applications may be granted in the discretion of the presiding judge, provided that he or she finds that it is in the public interest that the proceedings, or part of them, be televised or broadcast, and that to do so will not:

6.1.1 affect the right of a party to a fair trial;
6.1.2 cause discomfort to any witness;
6.1.3 interfere with any privacy interests that may override the public interest in televising the proceedings;
6.1.4 have the potential effect of deterring witnesses in any future similar cases;
6.1.5 cause additional expense to the Court; or
6.1.6 otherwise potentially hamper the ongoing administration of justice in relation to Provincial Court proceedings.

6.2 The presiding judge may use the BC Supreme Court Practice Direction on Video Recording or Broadcasting of Court Proceedings as a guide in assessing the merits of an application.

6.3 The onus of establishing that these conditions are met is on the applicant. The Court may adjourn an application in order that persons whose interests are engaged may obtain legal advice or representation, if to do so is not contrary to the interests of the parties or the public interest in having the matter proceed expeditiously.

6.4 The BC Supreme Court Practice Direction on Television Coverage of Court Proceedings can be found here.

7. Computers

7.1 Members of the public and the media are permitted to use portable computers in Provincial Court provided that they do not disturb the proceedings or interfere with the operation of the court’s own electronic equipment, and that the computers (subject to item 7 below) are used solely for the purpose of note-taking.

8. Electronic Devices in Courtrooms

8.1 See also Use of Electronic Devices in Courtrooms Policy. This policy sets out the permitted and prohibited use of electronic devices in courtrooms of the Court of Appeal, the Supreme Court and the Provincial Court of British Columbia.

9. Media Accreditation

9.1 See also Media Accreditation Process. This policy describes the process by which media personnel can become accredited with the Court of Appeal, the Supreme Court and the Provincial Court of British Columbia.

10. Judges’ Reasons for Judgment

10.1 When a Judge issues written reasons for judgment, they will be filed with the Court Registry, where a copy may be obtained. In addition, written reasons for judgment are often available on the Provincial Court’s website. If, instead, the reasons for judgment are delivered orally without written reasons being provided, a transcript of oral reasons for judgment can be ordered and requests to listen to the audio recording of a proceeding may be made to the Court Registry in accordance with the Access to Court Records Policy.

10.2 If it is anticipated there will be considerable media interest in a particular decision, efforts will be made by the Court to ensure that the decision is posted to the Court website as soon as possible after the decision has been delivered in Court.

11. Interviews by the Media

11.1 Judges of the Court speak through their decisions and Reasons for Judgment. Judges therefore do not comment on specific cases that are or have been before the Court or may come before the Court in the future.

Contact:
Provincial Court Legal Officer
provincialcourt.bc.ca/Media

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Effective Date: 07 October 2020
NP 23

Purpose

The BC Provincial Court sits in many court locations in the province. We have been working with government and in some cases, local communities, to have the consultant that government has retained view the circuit courts and make recommendations about what steps need to be taken to make those courts safe and accessible to members of the public. Once the consultant has viewed those court locations, we continue to work with government to implement the recommended changes so that existing matters can be heard in those locations in a timely way.

To reduce the number of people attending circuit court, counsel attendance at court should be limited to appearing on a matter scheduled in court where something substantive is happening. Counsel must endeavor to avoid unnecessary personal attendances of the accused or counsel at the courthouse wherever possible. Please refer to “Alternatives to in-person appearance” in CRIM 13 Practice Direction: Initial Appearance Court During COVID-19 and Notice to the Profession and Public COVID 19: Resumption of Court Operations.

Counsel are encouraged to use the Consent Requisition or Consent Arraignment forms to have files removed from the list prior to the scheduled court date if nothing substantive will occur on that date. We have attached a list below of the Judicial Case Managers and the circuit courts they are responsible for scheduling.

If you require legal assistance with your matter, you may contact Legal Aid at 1-866-577-2525.

Notice

If your court location is listed in the table immediately below, you will be required to contact the scheduling contact noted below for your location (by email or telephone) before the date you were originally scheduled to attend Court in order to set your next appearance date or to be provided with information regarding your next appearance date. If you do not know when your next court date is, you can also contact the scheduling contact noted below to obtain that information.

COURT LOCATION SCHEDULING CONTACT
100 Mile House Cariboo.Scheduling@provincialcourt.bc.ca
250-398-4377
Atlin L.Caporale@provnicialcourt.bc.ca
Anahim Lake Cariboo.Scheduling@provincialcourt.bc.ca
250-398-4377
Bella Bella Vanessa.Fong@gov.bc.ca
236-468-3628
Bella Coola  Vanessa.Fong@gov.bc.ca
236-468-3628
Burns Lake Smithers.Scheduling@provincialcourt.bc.ca
250-847-7482
Castlegar WKootenays.Scheduling@provincialcourt.bc.ca
250-354-6870
Chetwynd Peace.District.Scheduling@provincialcourt.bc.ca
250-787-3416
Clearwater Kamloops.Scheduling@provincialcourt.bc.ca
250-828-4086
Creston EKootenays.Scheduling@provincialcourt.bc.ca
250-426-1354
Dease Lake Terrace.Scheduling@provincialcourt.bc.ca
250-638-2140
Fernie EKootenays.Scheduling@provincialcourt.bc.ca
250-426-1354
Fort St. James PG.Scheduling@provincialcourt.bc.ca
250-614-2740 or 250-614-2756
Fraser Lake PG.Scheduling@provincialcourt.bc.ca
250-614-2756
Ganges/Saltspring Dun.Scheduling@provincialcourt.bc.ca
250-746-1201
Gold River CampbellRiver.Scheduling@provincialcourt.bc.ca
250-286-7556 (Mon and Tue)
250-334-1237 (Wed, Thu, and Fri)
Golden EKootenays.Scheduling@provincialcourt.bc.ca
250-426-1354
Good Hope Lake L.Caporale@provnicialcourt.bc.ca
Grand Forks WKootenays.Scheduling@provincialcourt.bc.ca
250-354-6870
Hazelton Smithers.Scheduling@provincialcourt.bc.ca
250-847-7482
Houston Smithers.Scheduling@provincialcourt.bc.ca
250-847-7482
Invermere EKootenays.Scheduling@provincialcourt.bc.ca
250-426-1354
Kitimat Terrace.Scheduling@provincialcourt.bc.ca
250-638-2140
Klemtu Vanessa.Fong@gov.bc.ca
236-468-3628
Kwadacha DKrenz@provincialcourt.bc.ca
Lillooet Kamloops.Scheduling@provincialcourt.bc.ca
250-828-4086
Lower Post L.Caporale@provnicialcourt.bc.ca
Mackenzie PG.Scheduling@provincialcourt.bc.ca
250-614-2740 or 250-614-2756
Masset PrinceRupert.Scheduling@provincialcourt.bc.ca
250-847-7482
McBride PG.Scheduling@provincialcourt.bc.ca
250-614-2756
Merritt Kamloops.Scheduling@provincialcourt.bc.ca
250-828-4086
Nakusp WKootenays.Scheduling@provincialcourt.bc.ca
250-354-6870
New Aiyansh Terrace.Scheduling@provincialcourt.bc.ca
250-638-2140
Pemberton NVan.Scheduling@provincialcourt.bc.ca
604-981-0293
Queen Charlotte City PrinceRupert.Scheduling@provincialcourt.bc.ca
250-847-7482
Revelstoke Vernon.Scheduling@provincialcourt.bc.ca
250-549-5433
Sparwood EKootenays.Scheduling@provincialcourt.bc.ca
250-426-1354
Stewart Terrace.Scheduling@provincialcourt.bc.ca
250-638-2140
Tofino Nanaimo.Scheduling@provincialcourt.bc.ca
250-741-5868
Tsay Key Dene DKrenz@provincialcourt.bc.ca
Tumbler Ridge Peace.District.Scheduling@provincialcourt.bc.ca
250-787-3416
Valemount PG.Scheduling@provincialcourt.bc.ca
250-614-2740 or 250-614-2756
Vanderhoof PG.Scheduling@provincialcourt.bc.ca
250-614-2740 or 250-614-2756
Ucluelet Nanaimo.Scheduling@provincialcourt.bc.ca
250-741-5868

THE FOREGOING IS SUBJECT TO CHANGE, AND ANY UPDATES WILL BE POSTED ON THE COURT’S WEBSITE.

History of Notice to the Profession and Public

  • Original Notice to the Profession and Public issued on July 17, 2020. This Notice includes information from the Circuit Courts - Update – July 3, 2020.
  • Updates to locations and manner of hearing July 29, 2020.
  • Updates to locations and manner of hearing August 7, 2020.
  • Updates to charts and contact information August 19, 2020.

By Direction of Chief Judge Melissa Gillespie
Provincial Court of British Columbia